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Hotels are employing Instagram experts – 25.07.2018

Hotels are employing Instagram experts

The Fairmont Scottsdale Princess, a luxury hotel in Arizona, has created the new role of Instagram concierge to improve the stay and holiday memories of its guests. The employee will be on hand to take photographs of guests when required, as well as make recommendations for backdrops, compositions and filters.

Read more here. 

*For many consumers, the need to document what they are doing via social media has become a daily habit – even to the extent that holiday makers are considering how ‘Instagrammable’ destinations are before booking. In response, hospitality brands and hotels are going to have to put as much emphasis on making sure their aesthetic and interiors are photo-ready, just as they would make sure that amenities such as catering and cleanliness are up to scratch.*

 

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Disney Parks gamifies waiting in line for its rides

Disney is using a new app to take the boredom out of waiting in line for rides at its parks and upping the family fun that the corporation is known for. Play Disney Parks is a free app that allows families to play games together and interact with their surroundings while they queue. The app is only available within the parameters of the theme park.

Read more here.

* This app enhances the Disney park adventure by integrating waiting into the experience, using AR to help make the entire visit immersive rather than simply distract or preoccupy people. It also encourages visitors to interact with the people they are with in that moment.*

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Facebook plans office in China

Facebook has secured a licence to set up an office in China in an apparent attempt to break into the lucrative market where its website is blocked. The firm said it would be an “innovation hub to support Chinese developers, innovators and start-ups”. If the office opens, it would be the firm’s first formal presence in China.

Read more here. 

 * This innovation lab is a far cry from Facebook being available to people in China, at least legally – it has been blocked since 2009. But it’s a start – and a chance for Facebook to experiment doing business in the country. It will be interesting to look closely at the types of businesses the firm backs in the area, given China’s record on the right to privacy. 

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