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Netflix tests video promos in between episodes, much to viewers’ dislike – 20.08.2018

Netflix tests video promos in between episodes, much to viewers’ dislike

 Netflix is testing video promos that play in between episodes of shows a viewer is streaming. The promos are full-screen videos, personalised to the user, featuring content Netflix would have otherwise suggested elsewhere in its user interface.

Read more here. 

* Needless to say, consumer reaction to these promos – which consumers have perceived as advertisements – has been fairly critical so far. Netflix is a paid subscription service, not an ad-supported one like Hulu. That means customers expect on-demand viewing with no ads. It will be interesting to see whether this feature makes it beyond the testing stages, and if it does, whether the platform will see a decline in popularity. Arguably, it would have been better for the platform to come out and admit they might be experimenting with ads, rather than continuing to state that these are just ‘breaks’ in the content. *

 

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Juicy Couture’s latest campaign pokes fun at influencers

Juicy Couture’s newly launched campaign for fall 2018 nods to influencer behaviour on social media by satirising sponsored posts. Using the hashtag #JUICYAD, all photos feature the headline “Paid Partnership with Juicy Couture”, the phrase that appears on influencers’ branded posts on Instagram.

Read more here. 

 *This is a great way of tapping into the ongoing conversation surrounding influencer marketing whilst not falling victim to many of the pitfalls associated with it (i.e. influencers failing to label content as sponsored). To further amplify the collection, Juicy Couture will activate the #JUICYAD hashtag throughout the season, as well as launch a content series on social media. #COUTURECHRONICLES will highlight specific influencer’s lifestyles and how the brand impacts their lives.*

 

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EU threatens Facebook, YouTube & Twitter with fines over online terror propaganda

 Europe is launching a fresh crackdown on online terror propaganda by threatening some of the largest internet companies such as YouTube, Facebook and Twitter with the imposition of fresh fines should they fail to act.

Read more here. 

* Europe’s frustrations emanate from a spate of high-profile terror attacks across the continent in recent years, despite the largest content providers such as Google and Facebook now removing terror material automatically. Will the prospect of a significant financial fine be enough to tackle this issue? Perhaps not, given that these companies are worth millions of pounds.*

  

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