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Twitter updates level the playing field for emoji character counts – 11.10.2018

Twitter updates level the playing field for emoji character counts

Twitter has announced that all emojis will count evenly toward the platform’s maximum 280 character limit. Before this update, various modifiers such as gender and skin tone caused certain emojis to use up more characters than other emojis.

Read more here.

* Twitter’s move might be a small one, but the previous system undid some of the good done by adding more inclusive emojis, encouraging people to continue to use the default colours and genders to stay within Twitter’s character count limit. Now, you can use whichever gender or skin tone you please, without it having any impact on the length of your Tweet.*

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Patent shows Alexa may soon detect when you’re sick and suggest remedies

Amazon has recently patented a new feature that would use voice-pattern analysis and sound recognition to identify when you’re feeling ill. The program would listen for changes in the pitch and tone of your voice, as well as for identifiers like a blown nose, and then make suggestions based on what it hears.

Read more here. 

* It seems that Amazon is looking to push for more medicinal-based functionality for its Alexa range. It has clearly recognised the increasing popularity of online GP apps such as Babylon, and wants to get in on the action.*

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Weibo introduces age restrictions to ‘protect minors’ as Government crackdowns continue

Weibo has introduced an age-restriction policy, which will see users aged under 14 years forbidden from registering an account with the Chinese micro-blogging giant.

Read more here. 

* The move brings Weibo into line with platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp, which insist users must be 13 years old to register an account. The move has been seen as a bid to appease the Chinese Government, which recently banned a number of gaming titles, restricted the sale of titles and restricted playing hours in a bid to protect minors.*  

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